FEATURED SPEAKERS

Heather Dalton

Heather Dalton

Organization:m5 Marketing Communications, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada Heather is a Partner in the m5 group of companies, the largest marketing and communications firm in Atlantic Canada. She oversees innovation across the group of companies, as well management...

Mr. Anis Somani

Mr. Anis Somani

Mr. Anis Somani is the Director of Business Development at Sunwell Technologies Ltd - a Toronto based global leader in ice slurry technology. Mr. Somani has a degree in Chemical Engineering and Business Management with over 25 years of diverse industrial experience....

Albert Caballero Solares

Albert Caballero Solares

Organization: Department of Ocean Sciences, Memorial University of Newfoundland (MUN), St. John's, Canada Dr. Albert Caballero Solares is a senior post-doctoral fellow in the lab of Dr. Matthew Rise (Department of Ocean Sciences, Memorial University). He earned his...

Dr. Matthew Rise

Dr. Matthew Rise

Organization: Department of Ocean Sciences, Memorial University of Newfoundland (MUN), St. John's, Canada Dr. Matthew Rise is a Professor with the Department of Ocean Sciences at Memorial University. He started there as the tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Marine...

Navaneethaiyer Umasuthan

Navaneethaiyer Umasuthan

Organization: Department of Ocean Sciences, Memorial University of Newfoundland (MUN), St. John's, Canada Umasuthan is a Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Ocean Science Centre (OSC), MUN. Umasuthan earned his B.Sc. in biochemistry and molecular biology from University of...

Jessica Fry

Jessica Fry

Organization: Ocean Sciences Centre, Memorial University, Logy Bay, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada Jessica Fry received her BSc. (Biology) from Memorial University, as well as Advanced Diploma in Sustainable Aquaculture from the Fisheries and Marine Institute in...

Dr. Javier Santander

Dr. Javier Santander

Organization: Memorial University of Newfoundland, Department of Ocean Sciences, St. John’s, NL, Canada Dr. Santander has been an Assistant Professor at Memorial University, Department of Ocean Sciences, since July 1st, 2016. Dr. Santander He completed his Bachelor´s...

KEYNOTE SPEAKER PROFILE

Keynote:

Steve Gaines is Dean of the Bren School of Environmental Science & Management at the University of California, Santa Barbara – a leader in education and research on solutions to environmental challenges. He is a marine ecologist who seeks conservation solutions by linking innovations in ocean science to more effective marine policy, management, and business. His science explores the design of marine reserve networks, climate change impacts on ocean ecosystems, sustainable fisheries management using market based reforms, and the role of aquaculture in meeting the future global demand for food in the most planet friendly way. In each of these science endeavors, he has been a strong promotor of more effective communication of ocean science to enhance its impact.

Dr. Gaines will be speaking on the future of food and how responsible increases in global protein production has to focus on gains in finfish and shellfish production. Aquaculture has a low environmental footprint among protein sources and is a good choice in meeting the future global food gap.

Biographies

Albert Caballero Solares

Organization: Department of Ocean Sciences, Memorial University of Newfoundland (MUN), St. John’s, Canada

Dr. Albert Caballero Solares is a senior post-doctoral fellow in the lab of Dr. Matthew Rise (Department of Ocean Sciences, Memorial University). He earned his B.Sc. in Oceanography at the University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain). Later on, he completed his M.Sc. and Ph.D. in Marine Sciences with distinction at the University of Barcelona (Spain), where he conducted research on the nutrition of farmed gilthead seabream.

Since joining Rise lab, Albert has been applying his experience and knowledge in fish physiology and metabolism to the investigation of dietary modulation of the expression of genes related to growth, metabolism, stress, and immunity in farmed Atlantic salmon. He is working or collaborating with several projects involving various Canadian universities (Memorial University and University of Prince Edward Island) and federal institutions (Department of Fisheries and Oceans), as well as global industrial partners (Cargill Innovation). Among the projects where he participates, there are two Genomic Applications Partnership Program (Genome Canada)-funded projects: “Biomarker Platform for Commercial Aquaculture Feed Development” and “Integrated Pathogen Management of Co-infection in Atlantic Salmon”. In the latter, Albert collaborates on the identification of feed formulations that could be advantageous for helping Atlantic salmon to fight co-infection with sea lice and a secondary pathogen.

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Anis Somani

Organization:  Sunwell Technologies Ltd

Mr. Anis Somani is the Director of Business Development at Sunwell Technologies Ltd – a Toronto based global leader in ice slurry technology. Mr. Somani has a degree in Chemical Engineering and Business Management with over 25 years of diverse industrial experience.

Title: OPTIMIZING MUSSEL PRESERVATION USING DEEPCHILL – AN ADVANCED COOLING TECHNOLOGY

Abstract: After fifteen years of research & development Sunwell Technologies of Toronto, Canada has created a powerful cooling medium commercially known as “DeepChill™ Variable-State Ice”. DeepChill has been recognized as the most advanced and effective means of product cooling available for food product processing and storage applications. It is comprised of billions of ice “micro-crystals” suspended in a liquid solution. These ice crystals are typically between 0.1 and 1 mm in diameter, have the flow characteristics of water and the cooling capacity of ice. It is an unparalleled cooling medium due to its high heat transfer surface when it contacts a product that is to be cooled. It can be utilized as a very liquid solution with a virtually undetectable ice concentration to a heavy “slush” containing a moderate ice content and ultimately even as a dry “crystal ice”. This presentation will present comparative test data on mussel preservation using DeepChill.

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Dr. Matthew Rise

Organization: Department of Ocean Sciences, Memorial University of Newfoundland (MUN), St. John’s, Canada

Dr. Matthew Rise is a Professor with the Department of Ocean Sciences at Memorial University. He started there as the tier 2 Canada Research Chair in Marine Biotechnology from 2006 to 2016. Dr. Rise’s current research program focuses on the use of genomics approaches to advance the understanding of genes and molecular pathways involved in fish growth, development, responses to novel diets, and defense against pathogens and environmental stressors.

Dr. Rise has played key roles in several large-scale aquaculture-related projects.  For example, he is the Academic Lead for two Genome Canada funded projects “Biomarker Platform for Commercial Aquaculture Feed Development” and “Integrated Pathogen Management of Co-infection in Atlantic Salmon”.  His is also Lead for one of the modules (“Improving Sustainability and Mitigating the Challenges of Aquaculture”) within the Ocean Frontier Institute  (OFI), funded by the Canada First Research Excellence Fund (CFREF).

In addition, Dr. Rise is an associate editor and the past editor-in-chief of the journal Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part D: Genomics and Proteomics, and he currently serves on the editorial boards of the journals Marine Biotechnology and Developmental and Comparative Immunology. He was also recently appointed to a federal government Independent Expert Panel on Aquaculture Science to provide advice and recommendations to the Minister of Science and the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans.

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Dr. Stefanie Colombo

Organization: Department of Animal Science and Aquaculture, Faculty of Agriculture, Dalhousie University, Truro, Nova Scotia, Canada

Dr. Stefanie Colombo is a Canada Research Chair (Tier II) in Aquaculture Nutrition, and Assistant Professor at Dalhousie University- Agricultural Campus. She completed her B.Sc. in Marine & Freshwater Biology at the University of Guelph. Her M.Sc. (Biology) at Dalhousie focused on sustainable sources of protein and lipid for farmed Atlantic halibut. She then completed her Ph.D. in Biology at Memorial University of Newfoundland, investigating camelina oil as a lipid source for farmed fish with focus on lipid biochemistry. She did a postdoc at Ryerson University, and focused on essential fatty acids in aquatic ecosystems. She is currently the Past-President of the Aquaculture Association of Canada.

 

Speaker: Dr. Stefanie Colombo

Organization: Department of Animal Science and Aquaculture, Faculty of Agriculture, Dalhousie University, Truro, Nova Scotia, Canada

Title: Investigating microalgae oil as a source of EPA and DHA in diets for farmed Atlantic salmon

Colombo, S.M.1*, Parrish, C.C.2, Wei, M.1, and Rise, M.L.2

1Department of Animal Science and Aquaculture, Faculty of Agriculture, Dalhousie University, Truro, Nova Scotia, Canada

2Department of Ocean Sciences, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada

*Email: scolombo@dal.ca

Abstract
Farmed Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) require a dietary source of the long chain-polyunsaturated fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), at a level of ~2% of the diet. Both EPA and DHA contribute to normal health and growth and are critical to survival. However, a major challenge is providing a sustainable dietary source of EPA and DHA. Microalgae are primary producers of EPA and DHA in aquatic ecosystems, and are unique sources of other micronutrients that may be beneficial to fish health. We used microalgae oil containing high levels of DHA, and trace levels of EPA to replace fish oil in diets for juvenile salmon parr (initial weight 24 ± 4 g/fish). Four treatments were fed to salmon for 16 weeks: a control diet with high levels of fish meal and oil, a secondary control diet with minimum fish meal and oil levels similar to current commercial feeds, a diet without fish oil and a low level of microalgae oil, and a diet without fish oil and a higher level of microalgae oil. Overall health and growth performance will be evaluated, as well as fillet lipid and fatty acid content, and gene expression in fillet and liver. In addition, more advanced lipidomic and compound-specific isotope ratio analyses will be conducted.

Speaker: Suzanne Dufour

Organization: Department of Biology, Memorial University, St. John’s, NL, Canada

Title: The seafloor microbiome at Newfoundland aquaculture sites

Abstract: Salmonid aquaculture operations are associated with organic loading at the seafloor, due to the deposition of uneaten feed and feces beneath and around cages. The first organisms to respond to this organic loading are microbes, which rapidly colonize and promote the degradation of this material. The marine environment contains a staggering diversity of bacteria with wide-ranging metabolic capabilities, and characterizing the assemblages of bacteria found at a particular site can provide useful information on the state of the environment.

I will present some recent research describing seafloor bacterial communities (the “microbiome”) at Newfoundland salmonid aquaculture sites undergoing production, or in fallow, to illustrate how this information can be used to discriminate phases of organic matter breakdown. New developments in sequencer technology could facilitate the rapid and cost-effective sequencing of microbiome in environmental samples, directly at the aquaculture site.

Dr. Suzanne Dufour

Organization: Department of Biology, Memorial University, St. John’s, NL, Canada

Suzanne is an Associate Professor in the Department of Biology at Memorial University (MUN).

Suzanne has a Ph.D. in Marine Biology from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, and an M.Sc. and B.Sc. in Biology from l’Université de Moncton.

Her work focuses mostly on animal-bacterial interactions and adaptations to organic-rich environments. She has worked on biological responses to organic enrichment at Newfoundland aquaculture sites since 2010, in collaboration with DFO researchers and industry partners. She has led or been involved with projects examining the detection of organic enrichment at the seafloor in aquaculture sites in Newfoundland, or that focus on opportunistic worms or bacteria at aquaculture sites. She has supervised or co-supervised five graduate students, one undergraduate student and one postdoc working on aquaculture research projects at Memorial University and DFO.

As Associate Professor, Suzanne teaches courses on invertebrate zoology and marine biology, and supervises student research projects.

 

Dr. Alexandra Eaves

Organization: Research Scientist Contractor to Marine Harvest Canada (based from St. John’s Newfoundland)

Alexandra (Alex) is a Research Scientist under contract to Marine Harvest Canada as well as an Adjunct Professor with the Department of Ocean Sciences at Memorial University of Newfoundland. She has a B.Sc. and M.Sc. in Biology from the University of Victoria B.C. and a Ph.D. in Biological Sciences from the University of Alberta.

Alex began working in aquaculture during her graduate career on the west coast of Vancouver Island producing kelp seedlings for farmers and coastal habitat restorations projects. She studied the effects of environmental stress on developing marine organisms and began studying salmon farming as a Research Scientist at the British Columbia Centre for Aquatic Health Sciences a decade ago. Since then, Alex has worked in government and in industry conducting environmental monitoring and fish health surveillance programs. Alex maintains her research interests in fish parasite investigations and is currently researching and developing programs to improve understanding and management of fish health challenges.

Title: The environment of fish health in salmon aquaculture – what is happening?

Abstract: There are widely conflicting reports on the status of fish health challenges (pathogens and environmental) associated with salmon farming and this controversy is most acute in British Columbia, Canada. A key information gap in addressing this controversy is insufficient historical wild fish health data to provide accurate context of what pathogens have been present in what hosts and for how long.
To provide greater clarity as to the nature of fish health challenges over a farming production cycle, we examine the fish health occurrences and farm management responses during marine growth phase using farms in the Broughton Archipelago as a case study.
We outline what is known about the various challenges identified (such as hosts species, historical prevalence, effects on host and environmental conditions that may be associated) and identify opportunities to improve understanding of fish health challenges and inform how fish health management is adapting.

Dr. Ian A. Fleming

Organization: Department of Ocean Sciences, Memorial University, St. John’s, NL, Canada

Ian is a Professor of Fish Evolutionary Ecology in the Department of Ocean Sciences. His research integrates perspectives from evolutionary ecology with fishery and conservation biology.  He has worked extensively on the management and conservation of wild fish populations including species invasions, the restoration of endangered populations, and interactions between aquaculture and wild fish.  Ian has published widely and has served in a number of capacities related to fisheries research and policy and marine biodiversity. He currently leads an NSERC Strategic Project Grant entitled Evolutionary and ecological impact of the escape of farm salmon: policy and mitigation strategies, the results from which he will be discussing at this meeting. He has previously held academic/research positions at the Norwegian Institute for Nature Research (1991-2001) and Oregon State University (2001-04).

Co-authors: Ian Bradbury, Shahinur S. Islam, Emma V.A. Sylvester, Brendan F. Wringe, Steven J. Duffy, Ben Perriman

Title: Outcomes and interactions resulting from escaped farmed salmon breeding in wild salmon rivers in Newfoundland.

Abstract: Escapes of farmed Atlantic salmon from net pens can lead to interactions and hybridization with wild salmon populations. An understanding of the outcomes and consequences of this, however, remain limited, particularly in Newfoundland waters. We apply SNP-based screening following a single large aquaculture escape in Newfoundland and report evidence of wide-spread interbreeding (i.e. 27.1% hybrid or feral individuals, 17/18 rivers). The proportion of hybrids varied spatially, being higher in smaller rivers and decreasing with migratory difficulty. The presence of domestic alleles from this cohort decreased annually, consistent with selection against domestic genotypes in the wild. Experimental crosses revealed farmed juveniles to be bolder, more risk adverse and aggressive than wild and hybrid juveniles, and for growth to vary by competitive environment. Consideration of spatial variation in hybridization, trait and competitive differences, and the strength of selection will be essential for the evaluation of impacts that escaped farmed salmon impose on wild salmon populations.

Jessica Fry

Organization: Ocean Sciences Centre, Memorial University, Logy Bay, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada

Jessica Fry received her BSc. (Biology) from Memorial University, as well as Advanced Diploma in Sustainable Aquaculture from the Fisheries and Marine Institute in St. John’s, NL.  After 2 years as a research technician, she returned to Memorial to pursue a MSc. (Aquaculture), focusing on the impacts of egg disinfection on larval success in fresh and salt water fin fish. Upon the completion of her MSc, Jessica joined the staff of the Dr. Joe Brown Aquatic Research Building as a science technician participating in salmon feed trials and the development of larval rearing protocols for salt water species including the two Canadian cleaner fish species.  During her 9 years in aquaculture, Jessica has split her time evenly between private industry and Memorial, working in a variety of fresh and salt water aquaculture facilities.

Title: Cleaner Fish Research in Support of the Atlantic Canadian Salmon Aquaculture Industry

Abstract:Sea lice control is one of the top research and development priorities for Atlantic Canada’s finfish aquaculture sector. Potential losses in market value of salmon and resistance to prolonged reliance on any single therapeutant are key drivers that have prompted interest in the potential utilization of local cleaner fish species such as lumpfish and cunner. Cleaner fish are fish that provide a service to other species by feeding on ectoparasites therefore reducing parasite infections. This talk will highlight some current research at the Dr. Joe Brown Aquatic Research Building (MUN-OSC) on broodstock management including spawning and egg production, and photoperiod manipulation of domesticated lumpfish.

Dr. Patrick Gagnon

Organization: Department of Ocean Sciences, MUN, St. John’s, NL, Canada

Patrick is an Associate Professor of Marine Biology and Ecology in the Department of Ocean Sciences at Memorial University (MUN).

Patrick has a B.Sc. in Biology and a Ph.D. in Marine Biology from Université Laval in Québec City. Before joining MUN, he completed postdoctoral research in the private sector and at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Patrick’s work at MUN focuses largely on factors and processes that govern the structure, function, and stability of cold marine benthic systems. His field- and lab-based research integrates perspectives from ecology, oceanography, phycology, physiology, remote sensing, GIS, and modeling to better understand and predict changes in marine communities exposed to natural and anthropogenic stressors. This interdisciplinary program involves collaborations with academic, industry, and government partners and the supervision of undergraduate and graduate students. Patrick has more than 20 years of experience researching various aspects of the biology and ecology of green sea urchin in eastern Canada. Over the last three years, he has created research partnerships with international, national, and provincial industry partners to examine various approaches to consistent urchin roe production that could help establish the foundation of an urchin farming industry in Newfoundland.

Title: Land-based approaches to green sea urchin roe production in Newfoundland

Abstract: With densities of up to 300 individuals m-2, green sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis) is the dominant macroinvertebrate in shallow rocky habitats in Newfoundland, representing a largely untapped resource for the province. I will report on ongoing research testing several land-based approaches to quick production of high volumes of high-quality roe in Newfoundland green sea urchin. Both approaches are based on use of a state-of-the-art formulated feed but expose urchins to markedly different hydrodynamic conditions and stocking densities. Feed performs equally well in low-flow “conical tank” and high-flow “raceway” systems, increasing roe content in urchins taken from barrens from ⁓4.5 to more than 15% (market standard) in less than six weeks. Urchin mortality in both systems is low, <1%, even at a biomass of up to 10.4 kg urchins m‑2. Feed formulation is currently being optimized to bring roe color and taste closer to market’s expectations regardless of water temperature.

Name: Rachel Major

Organization: Deep Trekker Inc

Rachel is the Aquaculture Business Development Representative at Deep Trekker Inc. Based out of Kitchener, Ontario, Deep Trekker is a fully Canadian made and owned company.

Rachel works with customers to understand their business goals, specific ROV needs, and provide a Deep Trekker product recommendation that will enhance their current operations, in regards to operational cost and overall safety. Rachel has quickly become an industry leader in the application of Deep Trekker ROVs, through product demonstrations and global travel.

Title: Deep Trekker ROVs for Aquaculture: Developing easier, efficient and more cost-effective inspections for informed on-site decision making.

Abstract:
Deep Trekker builds ROVs to make a variety of aquaculture tasks easier, more efficient and more cost-effective. Deep Trekker ROVs can be used for net inspections, compliance inspections, benthic surveys, to observe fish behaviour and much more. With information at their finger tips, site managers can now make informed decisions to protect their profit and the health and safety of the environment.
Our products have been refined and tested in field to bring innovation based on customer feedback, which is demonstrated through our numerous case studies and testimonials.

 

Name: Heather Manuel

Organization: Fisheries and Marine Institute, MUN, St. John’s, NL, Canada

Heather is the Director of the Centre for Aquaculture and Seafood Development (CASD) for the Fisheries and Marine Institute (MI).

Heather holds master’s degrees in Food Science and Business Administration from Memorial University and is currently a PhD candidate in Memorial’s Environmental Science program. Her main area of research is Value Chain Optimization of Marine Biomass Waste Streams.

In her current role with MI, Heather is responsible for the management of the CASD and fulfilling its mandate to enhance the competiveness of Newfoundland and Labrador’s aquaculture and seafood processing industries. Heather leads a diverse teams of 15 scientific and technical researchers to assist industry with their scientific and technical needs in areas related to: site evaluations, new strain assessments, equipment design and process automation, industrial applications of new technologies, and evaluation of marine bioprocessing opportunities.

Speakers: Heather Manuel, Director – Centre for Aquaculture and Seafood Development;

Anis Somani – Business Director, Sunwell Technologies

Organization: Fisheries and Marine Institute, MUN, St. John’s, NL, Canada
Sunwell Technologies, Toronto, ON, Canada

Title: Mussel Value Chain Assessment, including Chilling Technology

Abstract: In Newfoundland and Labrador, the blue mussel is the main commercial shellfish aquaculture species. The 2016 shellfish production volume was 3,211 tonnes, with a market value of $13.6 million. In 2016, there were 53 commercial shellfish site licenses that covered a combined area of 4,403 hectares. More growth is planned for the commercial mussel sector in the next few years, to increase production to 10,750 MT by increasing the water area available for development. With this planned expansion, the mussel industry has expressed interest in identifying opportunities for value addition, such as waste reduction and recovery, as the volumes of mussel bio-waste will grow along with the increased production yields.

Limited research has been done regarding opportunities for value addition and waste stream potentials in the Newfoundland and Labrador mussel industry. In response to industry’s expression of interest, this paper aims to identify waste stream components, opportunities for value addition, and potential markets for NL blue mussel products.
In addition, special interest in new technologies for quality improvement, such as Sunwell’s DeepChill Ice Slurry technology, has been identified and will be discussed, including preliminary trials which were conducted at the Marine Institute in 2017.

Speaker: Matthew L. Rise1

Co-authors: Albert Caballero-Solares1, Xi Xue1, Jennifer R. Hall2, Khalil Eslamloo1, Maryam Beheshti Foroutani1, Christopher C. Parrish1and Richard G. Taylor3

Organization: 1Department of Ocean Sciences, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL, Canada. 2Aquatic Research Cluster, CREAIT Network, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL, Canada. 3 Cargill Animal Nutrition, Minnesota, USA.

Title: Advances towards the dietary manipulation of immunity in farmed Atlantic salmon. Part 1: Discovery of diet-responsive immune biomarker genes using functional genomic tools

Abstract: Salmon aquaculture faces diseases and the need to replace fish meal (FM) and oil (FO) with terrestrial alternatives while maintaining or improving fish health. To study how dietary replacement of FM and FO with animal and plant alternatives influences growth and immunity, a 14-week feeding trial was conducted. Atlantic salmon fed an FM/FO-based diet, and a vegetable meal/oil-based diet had comparable growth performance while feeding an animal by-product meal/vegetable oil-based diet reduced growth. A 44K microarray experiment identified liver transcripts involved in immunity (e.g., mx, mhcI, igd). Singleplex qPCR revealed significant dietary modulation of immune biomarker genes upon challenge with viral mimic pIC. Correlation analyses indicated that dietary omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids influence fish immune response. Also, multiplex qPCR found diet-responsive hepatic transcripts related to oxidative stress and inflammation. The knowledge and tools derived from this research will help in the formulation of superior health-promoting feeds for Atlantic salmon.

 

Dr. Javier Santander

Organization: Memorial University of Newfoundland, Department of Ocean Sciences, St. John’s, NL, Canada

Dr. Santander has been an Assistant Professor at Memorial University, Department of Ocean Sciences, since July 1st, 2016.

Dr. Santander He completed his Bachelor´s degree in Marine Biology at the Catholic University of the North, Chile, and his Master’s degree in Microbiology at Pontifical Catholic University of Valparaiso, Chile. He obtained his PhD degree in Microbiology at Arizona State University, Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology in the field of fish vaccinology.

Dr. Santander has developed several vaccines for the catfish aquaculture industry and described several fundamental aspects of bacterial pathogenesis in catfish. He moved to Memorial University in 2016 as Assistant Professor. Currently, his research is related to Atlantic salmon and lumpfish bacterial pathogenesis and vaccinology. His team is evaluating commercial vaccines and developing novel vaccines using genomics and transcriptomics tools.

Organization: Marine Microbial Pathogenesis and Vaccinology Laboratory, Department of Ocean Sciences, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL Canada.

Title: Vaccine evaluation and development against Vibrio anguillarum and Aeromonas salmonicida in lumpfish (Cyclopterus lumpus).

Abstract: Lumpfish (Cyclopterus lumpus), a native fish of the North Atlantic Ocean, is utilized as cleaner fish to control sea-lice infestations. Effective vaccine programs against bacterial pathogens, like Aeromonas salmonicida and Vibrio anguillarum, have been identified as a high priority area for lumpfish production in Atlantic Canada. We have evaluated three commercial vaccines against these bacterial pathogens. Also, using fully characterized V. anguillarum and A. salmonicida strains we developed and tested several in-house vaccines, including bacterins and purified antigens. Additionally, we have evaluated the effect boost immunizations and adjuvant during lumpfish vaccination. Our results showed that vaccine design strongly influence lumpfish immune protection against the infection challenge. These results provided a guide for lumpfish vaccine program in Atlantic Canada.

 

Navaneethaiyer Umasuthan

Organization: Department of Ocean Sciences, Memorial University of Newfoundland (MUN), St. John’s, Canada

Umasuthan is a Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Ocean Science Centre (OSC), MUN.

Umasuthan earned his B.Sc. in biochemistry and molecular biology from University of Colombo (Sri Lanka) and both M.Sc and Ph.D in marine life sciences from the Jeju National University (South Korea).

He was a post-doctoral researcher at Jeju National University for one year (2014-2015). He then received a fellowship from Japanese Society for the Advancement of Science (JSPS) to conduct research at Nihon University (Japan) for 18 months prior to joining Professor Matt Rise’s group at the OSC, MUN in 2017.

Umasuthan has been working on aquatic animal models and has experience related to cloning, gene characterization, transcriptomics, recombinant proteins and functional assays. He has published more than 60 articles. He is currently involved in a Genome Canada funded project in collaboration with Cargill Innovation that assesses the impact of nutrition on salmon immune response using genomic and transcriptomic techniques.

 

Dr. A. Kurt Gamperl

Organization: Department of Ocean Sciences, Memorial University of Newfoundland

Dr. A. Kurt Gamperl is a Professor in the Department of Ocean Sciences at Memorial University of Newfoundland where he teaches courses in animal physiology and aquaculture, and researches how environmental factors (e.g., temperature, hypoxia, depth, domestication) affect fish energetics, stress and cardiorespiratory physiology, and immunology. This research program is very integrative (i.e., from genomics, to biochemical and hormone measurements, to respirometry, to the telemetry of free-living fishes) and involves both fundamental (basic) and applied (aquaculture) aspects. He is currently Co-Lead of the ‘Mitigating the Impact of Climate-Related Challenges on Salmon Aquaculture’ (MICCSA) project, and the lead scientist for two Ocean Frontier Institute projects working to improve the culture of Atlantic salmon and sablefish. He has published over 100 scientific articles / book chapters / books, is a member of NAIA’s STAR-NL committee, and contributes regularly to the organization of scientific sessions for the U.S.’s Triennial World Aquaculture Meeting.

Title: Impacts of High Temperature and Moderate Hypoxia on the Production Characteristics, Physiology and Immunology of Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar)

Co-authors: F.S. Zanuzzo, A. Beemelmanns, O.O. Ajiboye, M.L. Rise, R.M. Sandrelli, J.R. Hall, X. Xue and E. Peroni. Department of Ocean Sciences, Memorial University. St. John’s, NL.

Abstract: Climate change is predicted to increase seawater temperatures by 2-4oC this century and result in more frequent and severe hypoxic events, and these conditions may be a challenge for sea-caged salmon in Atlantic Canada. Thus, we investigated how increases in summer seawater temperatures (from 12 to 20oC or to 23oC at 1oC week-1) alone, or in combination with moderate hypoxia (~ 70% air sat.), affected the growth, survival, physiology and immunology of Atlantic salmon. This research shows that: 1) salmon can survive, and do well, when held at temperatures up to 20oC for prolonged periods; 2) while moderate hypoxia does not affect the temperature at which mortalities occur (21oC and above), fish exposed to warm temperatures and hypoxia show reduced food consumption and growth; and 3) these conditions have a significant effect on the salmon’s gene expression. These latter results may be particularly valuable for developing assays to assess fish health and/or to develop future broodstock.

Stewart Graham

Organization: Gael Force Group

Stewart Graham is the founder and Managing Director of Aquaculture Equipment and Technology Supplier, Gael Force Group.

Stewart’s leadership, contribution and passion for Scottish Aquaculture has been unwavering over the past 30 years, but no more so than in the past few years where he has led from the front in strengthening Gael Force Group’s position as the leading SME manufacturing and supplying equipment, technology and services in the aquaculture sector and, most recently, in bringing together leading businesses and organisations across aquaculture sectors to create a working group which would go on to produce the growth strategy for aquaculture in Scotland to 2030 and form an Industry Leadership Group for Scottish Aquaculture, of which he now Co-Chairs.

Brian March

Organization: Sani Marc Inc

Brian March has worked for 21 years providing sanitation products and support services in the seafood industries in Atlantic Canada and more recently, the food and beverage industry in  Ontario and Western Canada.  In the early days,  his primary focus was high risk foods such as  ready-to-eat crab, cooked-and-peeled shrimp  and sushi products. He was involved developing and supporting sanitation programs that met or exceeded the quality standards of international audit protocols (GFSI, M&S, etc) as well as Far East sushi markets. Supporting this industry involved participating in R&D projects for the development of antimicrobial interventions for seafood quality and shelf-life extension.

In his current role is Sales Director, Ontario & Western Canada for the Food & Beverage Division of Sani Marc Inc, he continues these activities in the context of the National food sector and has garnered much experience from the Canadian context.

Abstract: The highest quality fresh farmed and wild caught fish and seafood can demand a premium price in the market.  However, Newfoundland producers have a market proximity disadvantage: The Cabot Strait can add days of transport delays and costs.

This presentation will explore an anti-microbial intervention that effectively extends shelf life of fresh seafood.  It is environmentally friendly, organic certifiable and cost effective. It is widely used in the fresh fruit and vegetable, poultry, and meat industries, and presents multiple opportunities for seafood.

 

Chris McKindsey

Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Mont-Joli, Qc, Canada

Chris is a Research Scientist and Section Head (Aquaculture and Aquatic Invasive Species) with Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO).

Chris has a BSc (Biology) and MSc (Parasitology) from Concordia University (Montreal), a PhD (Coastal Ecology) from Université Laval (Quebec City), and completed postdoctoral studies (Coastal Ecology and Impact Assessment) at the University of Sydney, Australia. He is currently an adjunct professor at the Institut des Sciences de la Mer de Rimouski (ISMER) in Rimouski and Université Laval.

Chris’s work focuses largely on anthropogenic stressors in coastal areas, with a focus on aquaculture-environment interactions, aquatic invasive species, and habitat-community relationships. His interdisciplinary research involves partners from various levels of government, academia, community organizations, and industry partners. He uses observational, manipulative, and laboratory studies with a strong emphasis on field experiments, to provide science advice for coastal zone management. His work on aquaculture-environment interactions focuses on better understanding the role of shellfish and finfish aquaculture in coastal ecosystems. He has ongoing collaborations on all Canadian coasts as well as in Europe and Tahiti but most of his work focuses on issues on the Atlantic coast of Canada.

Title: Lobster and crab – salmon farm interactions in southwest New Brunswick, Canada

Abstract: Concerns about the impact of salmon farming on lobster and crabs were evaluated by examining their abundance and movements within and around Atlantic salmon farms in southwest New Brunswick. Lobster densities did not differ between the inside and outside of farms whereas crabs were more abundant below farms than outside of them, at times markedly so. In muddy sites, lobsters tended to leave the monitored area fairly rapidly, often passing within the farm, whereas those at another site stayed around the farm but did not go below it. At a rocky site, most lobster stayed within the monitored site, remaining below cages or within/outside of farm boundaries. Lobster home range size was not influenced by proximity to farm sites. Crabs were attracted by farms, often moving to and remaining below them for extended periods. Overall, farm effects on lobsters and crabs are limited and confined to directly below net pens.

Jennifer Murphy, Ph.D. Candidate

Organization: Memorial University, St. John’s, NL, Canada

Jennifer grew up in Newfoundland with a passion for science and wanting to understand the world around her. She is a Ph.D. candidate at Memorial University and completed her B.Sc. (Hons.) degree in Chemistry there in 2013.

Her interests in Green Chemistry, a branch of chemistry that aims to minimize environmental impact of the chemical industry, led her to pursue her Ph.D. in the Green Chemistry and Catalysis Group at Memorial. Her thesis is concentrated on the development of clean processing technology for the utilization of waste from the mussel aquaculture industry so that by-products, such as damaged shells, can be used in new applications and add value to the industry.

She has recently returned to Newfoundland from five months in Australia where she conducted a research project at Monash University. Her work there focused on applying a calcium carbonate material from waste mussel shells in electrochemical devices for the development of sustainable energy.

Title: Applications of Calcium Carbonate Materials from Mussel Shell Waste

Abstract: Green chemistry has played a key role in the field of renewable feedstocks, an area of research that has been increasing rapidly over the last 15 years. Memorial University has been leading the way in the search for ocean-based renewable feedstocks. (1) Since 2011, mussel farming has grown by 47% in NL and continued growth could lead to waste disposal problems. Mussel shells are a renewable source of CaCO3, a widely used inorganic material that is mined from the Earth’s crust, and the residual protein on the mussel shells are rich in amino acids that could be used in nutraceuticals and fish feeds.

This presentation will describe the cleaning of waste blue mussels using environmentally-friendly and easily implemented technologies (2) as well as the development of applications for a unique calcium carbonate material as part of a safer and more sustainable supercapacitor, which are important components in ‘green’ energy devices.

1. Kerton, F. M., Liu, Y., Omari, K. W. and Hawboldt, K., Green Chem., 2013, 50, 860-871.
2. Murphy, J. N., Hawboldt, K., and Kerton, F. M., Green Chem., 2018, 20, 2913-2920.

Dr. Harry M. Murray

Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Centre, St. John’s, NL

Harry is a Research Scientist with Fisheries and Oceans Canada based at the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Centre, St. John’s, NL. He has worked in both basic and applied aquaculture science for more than 30 years and is currently the regional lead on mussel aquaculture research at DFO in St. John’s.

Education

  • BSc. Memorial University of NL
  • Advanced Diploma in Aquaculture, Marine Institute, MUN
  • MSc. Atlantic Veterinary College, UPEI
  • PhD. Memorial University of NL

 

Kristoffer Selvåg

Organization: Naviaq AS, Norway

Kristoffer is the Marketing Manager in Naviaq (CMO)

Kristoffer has a Bachelor in Management from the Royal Norwegian Navy Academy
He has worked in the aquaculture industry since 2001. He has experience from project management in positions from Aqualine (Midgard systems) and AQS (Deliceing, mooring diving etc). He has worked as a salmon farmer at SalMar and Marine Harvest.

In his current position, as CMO in Naviaq, he is working to show the possibilities the Naviaq system provides to fish farmers and service companies through collaboration. And how easy it can be to create added value through the efficiency that collaboration creates.

Title: We create a better future through digital collaboration.

Abstract: The aquaculture industry in Newfoundland and Labrador is leading the country in growth. As the sector expands, it will be further regulated by government and regional regulations. Naviaq offers an opportunity to stay ahead of these regulations. Our company are made by and for the aquaculture, and we offer a wide range of aquaculture-specific business services to the industry.

Our team have years of experience in serving the aquaculture industry. We focus on the field users and make documentation easy available so you can focus on making the worlds greatest salmon.

Martin Søreide

Organization: Aqualine AS

Martin is the CTO of Aqualine AS.

Martin has a M.Sc. in design of offshore constructions from the technical University in Trondheim, Norway.

He has worked 12 years in the offshore industry in Norway, with engineering and offshore operations for Statoil. He has worked with Aqualine AS since 2014, covering all technical aspects of cage constructions.

He is also responsible for the technical chapters of the revised technical Standard NS9415 in Norway.

Jenny Weitzman

Organization: Dalhousie University

Jenny Weitzman is an interdisciplinary PhD student at Dalhousie University. Her research works at the intersection of science and public policy where she studies the tools and strategies to support holistic decision-making for aquaculture. Jenny has developed an interest in the public’s understanding and acceptance of aquaculture, which she sees as an essential aspect of sustainable aquaculture. Through the Ocean Frontier Institute, Jenny’s PhD aims to develop an integrated framework for salmon aquaculture carrying capacity in Atlantic Canada that integrates production, ecological, and social carrying capacity. Her ultimate goal is to help managers and regulators support sustainable aquaculture and advance the pathways towards an ecosystem approach to aquaculture.

Jenny Weitzman is an interdisciplinary PhD student at Dalhousie University. Her research works at the intersection of science and public policy where she studies the tools and strategies to support holistic decision-making for aquaculture. Jenny has developed an interest in the public’s understanding and acceptance of aquaculture, which she sees as an essential aspect of sustainable aquaculture. Through the Ocean Frontier Institute, Jenny’s PhD aims to develop an integrated framework for salmon aquaculture carrying capacity in Atlantic Canada that integrates production, ecological, and social carrying capacity. Her ultimate goal is to help managers and regulators support sustainable aquaculture and advance the pathways towards an ecosystem approach to aquaculture.

Title: Canada’s public discourse on salmon farming: the media, stakeholders, and social license

Abstract: Public perceptions linked to net-pen aquaculture’s technological, environmental, regulatory and social challenges have influenced both aquaculture development and public trust in Canada. The findings from a content analysis of Canadian media in 2015 and 2016 found a complex discourse expressing a range of aquaculture attributes and involving diverse stakeholders. Results indicate considerable regional variabilities and differences in perceptions across specific topics. Complex interactions between environmental, socio-economic, and management attributes within articles further emphasizes the multi-faceted nature of the public discourse surrounding finfish aquaculture in Canada. Improving public trust and ensuring social license can thus benefit from research into developing and testing interdisciplinary management solutions.

Logan Zeinert

Organization: Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL, Canada

Logan is a Graduate Student at the Department of Ocean Sciences at Memorial University (MUN). He has a B.Sc. in Biological Sciences from The University of Waikato, New Zealand and is working towards a Masters in Science (Aquaculture) degree from MUN.

Logan hails from New Zealand and is an avid diver, utilizing this skill to work as a divemaster in Florida, before moving to The Bahamas to work as a researcher and teacher at the Cape Eleuthera Institute and their partner school, The Island School. Here he worked on numerous projects before meeting Dr. Iain McGaw, where they partnered and began preliminary studies on biofouling removal from sea cages before becoming a grad student with Dr. McGaw.

Logan’s research focuses on the Caribbean Spider Crab, investigating when the species reaches sexual maturity and its potential to remove biofouling on aquaculture cages.

Title: Learning from the Bahamas – utilizing a novel method to enhance perceptions of aquaculture in Newfoundland.

Abstract:
Biofouling is a significant issue for marine aquaculture pens and is conservatively estimated to contribute to 15% of production costs. With a global increase in the recognition and demand for responsible and sustainable aquaculture products, chemical prevention and manual removal of biofouling organisms is being replaced by non-toxic alternatives.

Caribbean spider crabs (Mithrax spinosissimus) were placed on a heavily fouled, unused SeaStation 3000 cage in Eleuthera, The Bahamas. These trials successfully demonstrated the effective removal of biofouling by spider crabs. After two weeks, crabs had removed 40% of fouling, and up to 90% after a month. Crabs were also shown to be more effective than manual diver scrubbing.

Based on these results, I explore possible uses of crustaceans in the Newfoundland aquaculture industry. These could include the spider crab, Hyas spp., as potential tool to reduce biofouling loads on salmon cages. In addition, ranching larger species like lobster and snow crab beneath sea cages could reduce environmental impacts by removing uneaten food and dead product, while aerating and irrigating the underlying seabed.